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Adaptive Practices: Other Resources

Uncovering Aboriginal Nursing Knowledge through Community through Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR)

Abstract

This paper presents the Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process of a study with Aboriginal nurses in Atlantic Canada. The paper describes the innovative use of capacity building strategies to actively engage team members in all aspects of the research and in addressing the three goals of CBPR; research, education and action. The paper concludes with discussion of the role that CBPR can play in enabling people, especially those who have been historically marginalized, to reclaim their voices and engage in the participatory appraisal of the issues influencing the health and health care of Aboriginal peoples in the region. Read more.

Traditional Medicine in Contemporary Context: New Directions by Dawn Martin-Hill

Abstract

The author explores First Nations, Inuit and Métis traditional medicine within the contemporary context, defining terms and identifying challenges related to sustainability. Read more.

Nunavut’s Health System: Annual Report on the State of Inuit Culture and Society, 2007/2008

Abstract

This report examines the state of Inuit health and health care in Nunavut. It addresses three overlapping themes: the condition of Inuit health, the financing and administration of health care and how health care is organized and delivered. Read more.

The Inuit Way: A Guide to Culture

Abstract

The Inuit Way has become one of the most popular and important documents that Pauktuutit has produced in our twenty-two year history. With more than ten thousand copies in print, The Inuit Way has helped a broad range of Canadians gain a better understanding and appreciation of Inuit culture. Read more.

The National Library of Medicine’s “Native Voices” Exhibit Shares Native Concepts of Health, Healing and Illness

Abstract

This new resource from the National Library of Medicine (USA) focuses on indigenous concepts of health, healing and illness. The site includes many free resources, with more recordings and resources to be added later. Read more.

A Conversation on Cultural Competence with Cindy Brach, Senior Health Policy Researcher, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

Abstract

This interview with Cindy Brach, a senior health policy researcher at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, presents innovative ideas concerning cultural and linguistic competence in hospitals. Read more.

Promoting Healing and Restoring Trust: Policy Recommendations for Improving Behavioral Health Care for American Indian/Alaska Native Adolescents

Abstract

American Indian/Alaska Native youth represent the strength and continued survival of many nations and tribes. However, they currently experience numerous health disparities and challenges, including the highest rate of suicide among 15 to 24 year-olds in the United States. This comprehensive literature review on the mental health of AI/AN youth highlights seven focal causes of behavioral health disparities. Read more.

Why We Need Success Stories in Reporting the Health of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: A Personal Perspective

Abstract

This commentary presents a personal perspective on the importance of highlighting successes, given the decades of negative reporting about the appalling ill-health of Australian aboriginal and Torres Strait peoples. While the focus is Australian, the message is pertinent to the Canadian context. The author is optimistic that a constructive approach at all levels of influence — health policy, health service delivery and community — may be successful in increasing the pool of health-care professionals for these peoples. Read more.

JAH: Journal of Aboriginal Health

Abstract

The Journal of Aboriginal Health is published by the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO). It was established with the intention of fostering a dynamic community of people concerned with issues of aboriginal health. Each issue of the journal has a guest editor who solicits appropriate papers from a variety of perspectives. All published articles are peer reviewed. The January 2010 issue, entitled The Decolonization of Health Through Indigenous Knowledge and Practice, may be of particular interest. Read more.