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20

Canadian Nurses Association

Glossary

The glossary is intended to provide nurses with a common language for

their reflections, discussions and actions related to nursing ethics.

While

not necessarily providing formal definitions, the glossary presents information in a

manner and language that is meant to be helpful and accessible.

Advance care planning:

an ongoing process of reflection, communication and

documentation regarding a person’s values and wishes for future health and personal

care in the event they become incapable of consenting to or refusing treatment or

other care. Conversations to inform health-care providers, family and friends — and

especially a substitute decision-maker — are regularly reviewed and updated. Such

conversations often clarify their wishes for future care and options for their end of

life. Attention must also be paid to provincial/territorial legal and health guidelines

(CNA, Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association [CHPCA], & Canadian Hospice

Palliative Care Nurses Group [CHPC-NG], 2015).

Advocate:

actively supporting a right and good cause; supporting others in speaking

for themselves or speaking on behalf of those who cannot speak for themselves.

Boundaries:

a boundary in the nurse-person relationship is the point at which

the relationship changes from professional and therapeutic to unprofessional and

personal (College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta [CARNA], 2011;

see

professional boundaries

).

Bullying:

(see

workplace bullying

)

Capable:

being able to understand and appreciate the consequences of various

options and make informed decisions about one’s own life, care and treatment.

Collaborate:

to build consensus and work together on common goals, processes

and outcomes (RNAO, 2006).

Colleagues:

all health-care providers and nurses working in all domains of practice.

Compassionate:

the ability to recognize and be aware of the suffering and

vulnerability of another, coupled with a commitment to respond with competence,

knowledge and skill.